Battery State-of-Health Estimation in Electric Vehicles

Battery State-of-Health Estimation in Electric Vehicles

Presenter: Ass. Prof. Dr. Erik Schaltz
Title: Battery State-of-Health Estimation in Electric Vehicles
Affiliation: Department of Energy Technology at Aalborg University

Abstract

The State-of-Health (SoH) of an electric vehicle (EV) battery is an important key performance indicator for the EV second-hand market as the battery is one of the most expensive components inside the EV. The Incremental Capacity Analysis (ICA) method is a promising tool to estimate the battery SoH. However, the method has mainly been demonstrated on a cell level in controlled laboratory environments. If the method should be practically feasible, should it also be applicable on pack or EV level. The main objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of the ICA method on pack and EV level. A BMWi3 EV based on Nickel-Manganese-Cobalt (NMC) battery cells is used as a case. Results obtained both on cell and EV level indicates the feasibility of the ICA method to be applicable on EV level also.

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Schaltz Erik
Erik Schaltz received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark, in 2005 and 2010, respectively. From 2009 to 2012 he has been an Assistant Professor and since 2012 he has been an Associate Professor. Both positions also at the Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University. At the Department he is the programme leader of the research programme in E-mobility and Industrial Drives and the vice programme leader of Battery Storage Systems. He has been the main supervisor in four completed PhD projects, guest editor in several journals related to batteries and e-mobility, and a part of more than 15 national and international research projects. His research interests include analysis, modeling, design, and control of power electronics, electric machines, energy storage devices including batteries and ultracapacitors, fuel cells, hybrid electric vehicles, thermoelectric generators, reliability, and inductive power transfer systems.